Adapting Police Services to New Immigration (Criminal by Leigh Culver

By Leigh Culver

Latino immigration to the Midwest has had an important influence on police-community family, quite, in smaller groups traditionally unaccustomed to different ethnic teams. This ebook describes the reviews of legislations enforcement organizations in 3 Mid-Missouri groups and their efforts to conform to their altering demographics whereas protecting present relatives with the bulk inhabitants. The findings show that the connection among legislations enforcement and the bulk groups was once confident and supportive. there have been a number of demanding situations, in spite of the fact that, to the advance of a cooperative police-Latino courting. those integrated the language barrier, worry of the police, immigration matters and the character of contacts among the police and Latino group.

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2001; Christensen and Crank 2001; Frank and Liederbach 2003; O’Shea 1999; Weisheit and Donnermeyer 2000; Weisheit, Wells, and Falcone 1994; 1995). This research reveals several characteristics which help define small-town and rural police agencies. First, in one of the most comprehensive examinations of rural policing, Weisheit, Wells, and Falcone (1995) found that unlike urban settings where municipal agencies are primarily responsible for police services, sheriffs’ departments play a far greater role in the administration of law enforcement in rural communities.

In Madison, Nebraska, population of 2,300, a pork processing plant operated by IBP has 1,000 employees. Approximately 65 percent of the workers are Latino or Mexican. Of the 200 students in the elementary school, more than 60 percent are from Spanish-speaking households (Dalla, Cramer, and Stanek 2002). In Missouri, the number of Latino residents has almost doubled from 61,702 in 1990 to 118,592 in 2000; this increase was caused by job availability in the state’s beef and poultry processing plants (Halladay 2001).

Approximately 65 percent of the workers are Latino or Mexican. Of the 200 students in the elementary school, more than 60 percent are from Spanish-speaking households (Dalla, Cramer, and Stanek 2002). In Missouri, the number of Latino residents has almost doubled from 61,702 in 1990 to 118,592 in 2000; this increase was caused by job availability in the state’s beef and poultry processing plants (Halladay 2001). Other rural communities that opened meatpacking plants experienced similar 36 Adapting Police Services to New Immigration demographic changes (see Aponte and Siles 1997; Grey 1997; Martin, Taylor, and Fix 1996; Stull, Broadway, and Erikson 1992).

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